19th February 2015, Studio B, The Performance Centre, Falmouth University.

This workshop explored rhythm and gesture through the creative processes of drawing and dance. We took inspiration from Paul Klee’s concept of ‘taking a line for a walk’, to approach the challenges of representing dynamic movement through line and mark-making.

This workshop explored rhythm and gesture through the creative processes of drawing and dance. We took inspiration from Paul Klee’s concept of ‘taking a line for a walk’, to approach the challenges of representing dynamic movement through line and mark-making.

We began with simple ideas and questions:
- How can we enter into the nature of rhythm through drawing?
- If lines can walk can they dance?

Bringing together BA Drawing and BA Dance/Choreography students, we encouraged an experimental approach of ‘moving feedback’ between students in order to become more aware of their own habitual approaches. We focused on rhythm and exercises on drawing the breath and walking and then translated this into improvised dance. Katrina and I acted as guides to assist the students in the co-creation of a series of large collaborative floor based drawings.

Feedback:

Both drawing and dance can be physical acts of expression. A drawing cannot be created without movement. The flow of energy created in a drawing is dependent on its maker feeling each mark in their body. From the black marks left on the floor from previous dances in the dance studio it was clear that drawing and dance share something. Leaning over that big sheet of paper and making gestural marks was like dancing to me; one choreography student in particular danced as she drew.

I have never moved around so much while drawing, and it has made me approach drawing from a different angle which has been really inspiring. I have realized I need to move around more in between drawing because it really makes you feel the marks you make in your body, giving them life. The most striking, interesting drawings usually have a sense of movement in them. How can you capture this without moving a bit yourself?


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